a

Beriberi

Beriberi is a disease caused by a vitamin B-1 deficiency, also known as thiamine deficiency. There are two types of the disease: wet beriberi and dry beriberi. Wet beriberi affects the heart and circulatory system. In extreme cases, wet beriberi can cause heart failure. Dry beriberi damages the nerves and can lead to decreased muscle strength and eventually, muscle paralysis. Beriberi can be life-threatening if it isn’t treated.

If you have access to foods rich in thiamine, your chances of developing beriberi are low. Today, beriberi mostly occurs in people with an alcohol use disorder. Beriberi from other causes are rare in the United States. Still, the disease can be seen in women who have extreme nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (hyperemesis gravidarum), in people with AIDS, and after bariatric surgery.

 

Beriberi is a disease in which the body does not have enough thiamine (vitamin B1).

The symptoms of beriberi vary depending on the type.

Wet beriberi symptoms include:

Dry beriberi symptoms include:

In extreme cases, beriberi is associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome are two forms of brain damage caused by thiamine deficiency.

Wernicke encephalopathy damages regions of the brain called the thalamus and hypothalamus. This condition can cause:

Korsakoff syndrome is the result of permanent damage to the region of the brain where memories form. It can cause:

 

Causes

There are two major types of beriberi:

Beriberi is rare in the United States. This is because most foods are now vitamin enriched. If you eat a normal, healthy diet, you should get enough thiamine. Today, beriberi occurs mostly in people who abuse alcohol. Drinking heavily can lead to poor nutrition. Excess alcohol makes it harder for the body to absorb and store vitamin B1.

In rare cases, beriberi can be genetic. This condition is passed down through families. People with this condition lose the ability to absorb thiamine from foods. This can happen slowly over time. The symptoms occur when the person is an adult. However, this diagnosis is often missed. This is because health care providers may not consider beriberi in nonalcoholics.

Beriberi can occur in infants when they are:

  • Breastfed and the mother's body is lacking in thiamine
  • Fed unusual formulas that don't have enough thiamine

Some medical treatments that can raise your risk of beriberi are:

  • Getting dialysis
  • Taking high doses of diuretics (water pills)

The main cause of beriberi is a diet low in thiamine. The disease is very rare in regions with access to vitamin-enriched foods, such as certain breakfast cereals and breads. Beriberi is most common in regions of the world where the diet includes unenriched, processed white rice, which only has a tenth of the amount of thiamine as brown rice.

Other factors may cause thiamine deficiency, as well. These include:

  • alcohol abuse, which can make it hard for your body to absorb and store thiamine
  • genetic beriberi, a rare condition that prevents the body from absorbing thiamine
  • hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland)
  • extreme nausea and vomiting in pregnancy
  • bariatric surgery
  • AIDS
  • prolonged diarrhea or use of diuretics (medication that makes you urinate more)
  • undergoing kidney dialysis

Breastfeeding mothers need daily thiamine in their diet. Infants drinking breast milk or formula low in thiamine are at risk for thiamine deficiency.

You will need a series of medical tests to determine whether or not you have beriberi. Blood and urine tests will measure the levels of thiamine in your body. If your body has trouble absorbing thiamine, you will have a low concentration of thiamine in your blood and a high concentration in your urine.

Doctors will also perform a neurological exam to look for lack of coordination, difficulty walkingdroopy eyelids, and weak reflexes. People with later stages of beriberi will show memory loss, confusion, or delusions.

A physical exam will alert your doctor to any heart problems. Rapid heartbeat, swelling of the lower legs, and difficulty breathing are all symptoms of beriberi.

 

 

โรคเหน็บชา

การขาดไทแอมินอย่างรุนแรงจะมีอาการทางคลินิกของโรคเหน็บชาซึ่งมีหลายแบบขึ้นอยู่กับอายุและอวัยวะ
ที่ได้รับผลกระทบจากการที่ร่างกายได้รับไทแอมินไม่เพียงพอ แบ่งออกเป็น โรคเหน็บชาในเด็ก (infantile 
beriberi) และโรคเหน็บชาในผู้ใหญ่ (adult beriberi)

ปริมาณที่แนะนำให้บริโภค

การเผาผลาญคาร์โบไฮเดรต ไขมัน และแอลกอฮอล์ให้เป็นพลังงานนั้นต้องอาศัยไทแอมินไพโรฟอสเฟต
เป็นโคเอนไซม์ ดังนั้นร่างกายต้องการไทแอมินเพิ่มขึ้นเมื่อมีการใช้พลังงานมากขึ้น จึงมีการกำหนดความ
ต้องการไทแอมินต่อพลังงานที่ได้รับจากอาหาร ผลการศึกษาพบว่าผู้ใหญ่ปกติเมื่อได้รับไทแอมินต่ำกว่า 0.16 
มิลลิกรัมต่อพลังงาน 1,000 กิโลแคลอรี จะเกิดอาการคลินิกของโรคเหน็บชา คือ ตัวบวมและหัวใจล้มเหลว 
(wet beriberi) และชาปลายมือปลายเท้า (dry beriberi) เมื่ออาสาสมัครได้รับไทแอมินเพิ่มขึ้นเป็น 0.3 มิลลิกรัม
ต่อพลังงาน 1,000 กิโลแคลอรี อาการคลินิกนั้นจะหายไปรวมทั้งค่าไทแอมินในปัสสาวะและเอนไซม์ 
transketolase ในเม็ดเลือดแดงจะเพิ่มขึ้นสู่ระดับปกติการกำหนดค่าปริมาณไธอะมินอ้างอิงที่ควรได้รับประจำวัน 
(Dietary Reference Intake, DRI) ของประเทศสหรัฐอเมริกาและแคนาดา ปี ค.ศ. 2000 กำหนดค่าประมาณของ
ความต้องการไทแอมินที่ควรได้รับประจำวัน (Estimated Average Requirement, EAR) ซึ่งเท่ากับ 1.0 มิลลิกรัม
ต่อวันในผู้ชายและ 0.9 มิลลิกรัมต่อวันในผู้หญิงแล้วนำไปคำนวณหาปริมาณไทแอมินที่ควรได้รับประจำวัน 
(Recommended Dietary Allowance, RDA) ของกลุ่มอายุต่างๆ ตั้งแต่ 1 ปีขึ้นไป สำหรับทารกแรกเกิดถึงอายุ 
12 เดือน กำหนดค่าปริมาณวิตามินบีหนึ่งอ้างอิงที่ควรได้รับประจำวัน (DRI) โดยใช้ค่าปริมาณไทแอมินที่
พอเพียงในแต่ละวัน (Adequate Intake, AI) ดังแสดงไว้ในตาราง

ตาราง ปริมาณไทแอมินอ้างอิงที่ควรได้รับประจำวันสำหรับกลุ่มบุคคลวัยต่างๆ

กลุ่มบุคคล

อายุ

ปริมาณไทแอมินอ้างอิงที่ควรได้รับประจำวัน

(มิลลิกรัมต่อวัน)

ทารก

0-5 เดือน

น้ำนมแม่ (0.2)

 

6-11 เดือน

0.3

เด็ก

1-3 ปี

0.5

 

4-5 ปี

0.6

 

6-8 ปี

0.6

วัยรุ่น

   

ชาย

9-12 ปี

0.9

 

13-15 ปี

1.2

 

16-18 ปี

1.2

หญิง

9-12 ปี

0.9

 

13-15 ปี

1.0

 

16-18 ปี

1.0

ผู้ใหญ่

   

ชาย

19-30 ปี

1.2

 

31-50 ปี

1.2

 

51-70 ปี

1.2

 

? 71 ปี

1.2

 

กลุ่มบุคคล

อายุ

ปริมาณไธอะมินอ้างอิงที่ควรได้รับประจำวัน

(มิลลิกรัมต่อวัน)

หญิง

19-30 ปี

1.1

 

31-50 ปี

1.1

 

51-70 ปี

1.1

 

>71 ปี

1.1

หญิงตั้งครรภ์

ไตรมาสที่ 1

+0.3

 

ไตรมาสที่ 2

+0.3

 

ไตรมาสที่ 3

+0.3

หญิงให้นมบุตร

0-5 เดือน

+0.3

 

6-11 เดือน

+.03

* แรกเกิดจนถึงก่อนอายุ 6 เดือน

 

 

ปริมาณสูงสุดของวิตามินบีหนึ่งที่รับได้ในแต่ละวัน

ขณะนี้ยังไม่มีรายงานเกี่ยวกับผลข้างเคียงจากการบริโภคไทแอมินปริมาณสูง จึงไม่มีข้อมูลเพียงพอที่จะ
กำหนดค่าปริมาณสูงสุดของไทแอมินที่ได้รับได้ในแต่ละวัน (Tolerable Upper Intake Level, UIL) โดยทั่วไป
การบริโภคไทแอมินปริมาณสูงหรือการฉีดเข้าเส้นเลือดดำค่อนข้างปลอดภัย การบริโภควิตามินบีหนึ่งปริมาณ
ที่สูงสุดเกินความต้องการของร่างกายจะไม่ถูกดูดซึมและถูกขับออกมาในปัสสาวะเกือบหมดภายใน 4 ชั่วโมง

 

ภาวะเป็นพิษ

ยังไม่มีรายงานขนาดของวิตามินบีหนึ่ง ที่ทำให้เกิดอาการเป็นพิษต่อร่างกายมนุษย์

 

แหล่งของวิตามินบีหนึ่ง

ร่างกายไม่สามารถสังเคราะห์วิตามินบีหนึ่งได้ จำเป็นต้องได้จากอาหารแหล่งอาหารที่มีวิตามินบีหนึ่งมากได้แก่

จากสัตว์ : เนื้อหมู, ปลา, ไก่, ตับ, ไข่

จากพืช : ถั่วเมล็ดแห้ง, เมล็ดข้าว ( whole grains)

ในอาหารจำพวกผักและผลไม้ ถึงแม้ว่าจะมีปริมาณของไทแอมินน้อย แต่ถ้าคิดจากที่กินในแต่ละวันแล้ว 
ร่างกายก็จะได้รับไทแอมินพอประมาณ

 

ชนิดของอาหาร

ปริมาณวิตามินบี 1 มิลลิกรัมต่ออาหาร 100 กรัม

เนื้อหมู, สด

0.69

หมู, ตับ

0.40

เนื้อวัว, สด

0.07

วัว, ตับ

0.32

ไก่, เนื้อ

0.08

ไก่, ตับ

0.36

ปลาดุก

0.20

ปลาทู, นึ่ง

0.09

ไข่เป็ดทั้งฟอง

0.28

ไข่ไก่ทั้งฟอง

0.15

ข้าวกล้อง, หอมมะลิ

0.55

ข้าวเจ้า, ซ้อมมือ

0.34

ข้าวมันปู

0.46

ข้าวเหนียว

0.08

ข้าวเหนียวดำ

0.55

งาขาว, คั่ว

0.83

งาดำ, อบ

0.75

ถั่วเหลือง, ดิบ

0.73

ถั่วเขียว, ดิบ

0.38

ถั่วแดง, ดิบ

0.73

ถั่วแระ, ต้ม

0.31

 

การเก็บรักษาคุณค่าทางโภชนาการ

  • ไทแอมินเป็นวิตามินที่ละลายในน้ำ ( Water soluble vitamine) ถูกทำลายด้วยความร้อนถ้าอยู่ในสารละลาย
    ที่มีฤทธิ์เป็นด่างหรือเป็นกลางและทนได้ถึง 120 องศาเซลเซียส ถ้าอยู่ในสารละลายที่เป็นกรด
  • ไทแอมินจะสูญเสียคุณค่าทางโภชนาการได้ ถ้าขณะที่ปรุงอาหารด้วยการให้ความร้อนเมื่อมีน้ำอยู่ด้วย 
    พบว่าในการหุงข้าวที่ซาวน้ำทิ้งหลายๆ ครั้ง แล้วหุงโดยไม่เช็ดน้ำ จะทำให้สูญเสียไทแอมินประมาณ 50 
    เปอร์เซ็นต์ ส่วนการหุงข้าวแบบเช็ดน้ำจะยิ่งทำให้การสูญเสียไทแอมินมากขึ้นอาจสูงถึง 80 เปอร์เซ็นต์ 
    ดังนั้นการหุงข้าวโดยไม่มีการซาวน้ำทิ้งเลยและหุงแบบไม่เช็ดน้ำจะช่วยเก็บรักษาไทแอมินไว้ในเมล็ดข้าว 
    ได้ดี
  • การย่างหรืออบ ( broiled or roasted) พวกเนื้อสัตว์อาจสูญเสียไทแอมินไม่เกิน 25 เปอร์เซ็นต์ ในขณะที่
    การต้มหรือลวกเนื้อแล้วทิ้งน้ำไปจะทำให้เสียวิตามินสูงถึง 50 เปอร์เซ็นต์ แต่ถ้ากินทั้งเนื้อและน้ำด้วย
    จะสูญเสียวิตามินไปประมาณ 25 เปอร์เซ็นต์ เท่านั้น
  • การต้มผักในน้ำน้อยๆ ให้สุกโดยเร็ว จะสูญเสียวิตามินน้อยกว่าการต้มนานๆ ในน้ำมากๆ ไม่ว่า จะเป็น
    วิตามินบี หรือ ซี

    โรคเหน็บชามี 2 แบบคือ โรคเหน็บชาแบบแห้ง (dry beriberi) และโรคเหน็บชาแบบเปียก (wet beriberi)

โรคเหน็บชาแบบแห้งอาการที่พบ คือน้ำหนักตัวจะลดลงอย่างรวดเร็ว กล้ามเนื้อลีบ อ่อนเพลีย มีการอักเสบของปลายประสาท 
เสียการทรงตัว มีอกาารวิตกกังวล มีความผิดปกติทางสมอง และหัวใจโต

ส่วนโรคเหน็บชาแบบเปียก มีอาการตรงกันข้ามคือ มีการบวมทั่วๆไป ตามแขนขา ลำคอ หน้า และมีอาการของโรคหัวใจ
เกิดขึ้นอย่างเฉียบพลัน

ภาวะการขาดวิตามินบีหนึ่งที่เกิดขึ้นกับเด็กทารก เรียกว่า Infantile Beriberi เกิดขึ้นเนื่องจากมารดาเป็นโรคขาดวิตามินบีหนึ่ง
ขณะตั้งครรภ์ ทำให้ทารกในครรภ์ได้รับวิตามินบีหนึ่งไม่เพียงพอ

เด็กทารกจะมีอาการหน้าบวม อาเจียน ปวดท้อง และร้องไม่มีเสียง เด็กอาจตายได้ภายในระยะเวลาสั้น

What does vitamin B-1 do? »

HEALTHLINE PARTNER SOLUTIONS

Get Answers from a Doctor in Minutes, Anytime

Have medical questions? Connect with a board-certified, experienced doctor online or by phone. Pediatricians and other specialists available 24/7.

JustAnswer

Beriberi is easily treated with thiamine supplements. Your doctor may prescribe a thiamine shot or pill. For severe cases, a healthcare professional will administer intravenous thiamine.

Your progress will be monitored with follow-up blood tests to see how well your body is absorbing the vitamin.

To prevent beriberi, eat a healthy, balanced diet that includes foods rich in thiamine. These include:

Cooking or processing any of the foods listed above decreases their thiamine content.

If you give your infant formula, you should also check that it contains enough thiamine. 

Always be sure to purchase infant formula from a reliable source.

Limiting alcohol consumption will reduce your risk of developing beriberi. Anyone who abuses alcohol should be checked routinely for a B-1 vitamin deficiency.

If beriberi is caught and treated early, the outlook is good. Nerve and heart damage from beriberi is usually reversible when it’s caught in the early stages. Recovery is often quick once you begin treatment.

If beriberi progresses to Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, the outlook is poor. While treatment can control symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy, brain damage from Korsakoff syndrome is often permanent.

Maintaining a healthy, balanced diet is important for your health. Talk to your doctor if you think you are showing signs of a thiamine deficiency or if you need advice on how to get the nutrients you need.


Practice Essentials

Thiamine deficiency, or beriberi, refers to the lack of thiamine pyrophosphate, the active form of the vitamin known as thiamine (also spelled thiamin), or vitamin B-1 (see the image below). Thiamine pyrophosphate, the biologically active form of thiamine, acts as a coenzyme in carbohydrate metabolism through the decarboxylation of alfa ketoacids. It also takes part in the formation of glucose by acting as a coenzyme for the transketolase in the pentose monophosphate pathway. (See Treatment and Medication.)

Beriberi in an adult patient.Beriberi in an adult patient.

See 21 Hidden Clues to Diagnosing Nutritional Deficiencies, a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify clues to conditions associated with malnutrition.

Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin that is absorbed in the jejunum by 2 processes. When the thiamine level in the small intestines is low, an active transport portal is responsible for absorption. When the thiamine concentration is high, a passive mucosal process takes place. Up to 5 mg of thiamine is absorbed through the small intestines. The small intestine is where phosphorylation of thiamine takes place. [1]

The body cannot produce thiamine and can only store up to 30 mg of it in tissues. Thiamine is mostly concentrated in the skeletal muscles. Other organs in which it is found are the brain, heart, liver, and kidneys. The half-life of thiamine is 9-18 days. It is excreted by the kidney. [2345]

Persons may become deficient in thiamine by not ingesting enough vitamin B-1 through the diet or may become deficient through excess use; the latter may result from hyperthyroidism, pregnancy, lactation, or fever. Prolonged diarrhea may impair the body's ability to absorb vitamin B-1, and severe liver disease impairs its use. (See Pathophysiology, Etiology, Presentation, and Workup.) [67]

Dietary thiamine

Food that are rich in thiamine are as follows [1] (see Table 1, below):

  • Whole-grain foods

  • Meat/fish/poultry/eggs

  • Milk and milk products

  • Vegetables (ie, green, leafy vegetables; beets; potatoes)

  • Legumes (ie, lentils, soybeans, nuts, seeds)

  • Orange and tomato juices

Thiamine is not present in fats or highly refined sugars and is present sparingly in cassava. Foods containing thiaminases, such as milled rice, shrimp, mussels, clams, fresh fish, and raw animal tissues, decrease absorption. [8]

Cassava is a staple in many developing countries and has been used in a variety of high-energy diets. Although it contains thiamine (0.05-0.225 mg of thiamine per 100 g of cassava, depending on the crop), the high carbohydrate load of a diet rich in cassava actually consumes more thiamine than it offers the body. This can produce a thiamine deficiency through the same mechanism observed when dextrose is administered to a person with limited supplies of the vitamin.

Table. Nutritional Needs for Specific Age Groups [9(Open Table in a new window)

Population

Age

Allowance, mg/day

Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs)

Boys

9-13 years

0.9

Men

>14 years

1.2

Girls

9-13 years

0.9

Women

14-18 years

1.0

Women

>19 years

1.1

Pregnant/lactating women

. . .

1.4

Children

1-3 years

0.5

Children

4-8 years

0.6

Adequate Intakes (AIs)

Infant

0-6 months

0.2

Infant

7-12 months

0.3

Patient education

Include education regarding Korsakoff syndrome (which arises from thiamine deficiency) for patients being treated for alcohol dependency, one of the causes of thiamine deficiency. As with any substance abuse treatment program, education needs to be combined with a serious, multidisciplinary team approach to have any chance of success.

With other causes of beriberi, once the primary problem has been addressed, an appropriate diet providing more-than-adequate thiamine levels should be adopted by the patient.

Diagnosis

For practical reasons, replacing thiamine as an initial test may be most feasible. If the patient responds to treatment, it is safe to assume that a measure of thiamine deficiency was responsible for the condition.

If laboratory confirmation is needed, measure blood thiamine, pyruvate, alfa-ketoglutarate, lactate, and glyoxylate levels. Also, measure urinary excretion of thiamine and its metabolites. A scarcity of any of these chemicals strongly suggests thiamine deficiency. [10]

In conjunction with whole blood or erythrocyte transketolase activity preloading and postloading, a thiamine loading test is the best indicator of thiamine deficiency. An increase of more than 15% in enzyme activity is a definitive marker of deficiency. However, this test is expensive and time consuming; it is performed only for criterion-standard proof of deficiency.

Measure urinary methylglyoxal; also measure serum thyroid-stimulating hormone(TSH), to rule out thyrotoxicosis-induced high-output heart failure, if applicable.

Management

In suspected cases of thiamine deficiency, prompt administration of parenteral thiamine is indicated. The recommended dose is 50 mg given intramuscularly for several days. The duration of therapy depends on the symptoms, and therapy is indicated until all symptoms have disappeared. Maintenance is recommended at 2.5-5 mg per day orally unless a malabsorption syndrome is suspected.

Most outpatient care is targeted at delivering thiamine in a bioavailable form to rehabilitated patients. Clinical follow-up with measurement of thiamine diphosphate activity may be warranted if relapse or noncompliance is suspected.

โรคเหน็บชา Beriberi

โรคเหน็บชาเป็นโรคที่ร่างกายขาดวิตามินบี 1

 

Definition

Beriberi is a disease in which the body does not have enough thiamine (vitamin B1).

Alternative Names

Thiamine deficiency; Vitamin B1 deficiency

Causes

There are two major types of beriberi:

Beriberi is rare in the United States. This is because most foods are now vitamin enriched. If you eat a normal, healthy diet, you should get enough thiamine. Today, beriberi occurs mostly in people who abuse alcohol. Drinking heavily can lead to poor nutrition. Excess alcohol makes it harder for the body to absorb and store vitamin B1.

In rare cases, beriberi can be genetic. This condition is passed down through families. People with this condition lose the ability to absorb thiamine from foods. This can happen slowly over time. The symptoms occur when the person is an adult. However, this diagnosis is often missed. This is because health care providers may not consider beriberi in nonalcoholics.

Beriberi can occur in infants when they are:

  • Breastfed and the mother's body is lacking in thiamine
  • Fed unusual formulas that don't have enough thiamine

Some medical treatments that can raise your risk of beriberi are:

  • Getting dialysis
  • Taking high doses of diuretics (water pills)

Symptoms

Symptoms of dry beriberi include:

  • Difficulty walking
  • Loss of feeling (sensation) in hands and feet
  • Loss of muscle function or paralysis of the lower legs
  • Mental confusion/speech difficulties
  • Pain
  • Strange eye movements (nystagmus)
  • Tingling
  • Vomiting

Symptoms of wet beriberi include:

  • Awakening at night short of breath
  • Increased heart rate
  • Shortness of breath with activity
  • Swelling of the lower legs

Exams and Tests

A physical examination may show signs of congestive heart failure, including:

A person with late-stage beriberi may be confused or have memory loss and delusions. The person may be less able to sense vibrations.

A neurological exam may show signs of:

  • Changes in the walk
  • Coordination problems
  • Decreased reflexes
  • Drooping of the eyelids

The following tests may be done:

  • Blood tests to measure the amount of thiamine in the blood
  • Urine tests to see if thiamine is passing through the urine

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to replace the thiamine your body is lacking. This is done with thiamine supplements. Thiamine supplements are given through a shot (injection) or taken by mouth.

Your provider may also suggest other types of vitamins.

Blood tests may be repeated after the treatment is started. These tests will show how well you are responding to the medicine.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Untreated, beriberi can be fatal. With treatment, symptoms usually improve quickly.

Heart damage is usually reversible. A full recovery is expected in these cases. However, if acute heart failure has already occurred, the outlook is poor.

Nervous system damage is also reversible, if caught early. If it is not caught early, some symptoms (such as memory loss) may remain, even with treatment.

If a person with Wernicke encephalopathy receives thiamine replacement, language problems, unusual eye movements, and walking difficulties may go away. However, Korsakoff syndrome (or Korsakoff psychosis) tends to develop as Wernicke symptoms go away.

Possible Complications

Complications may include:

  • Coma
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Death
  • Psychosis

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Beriberi is extremely rare in the United States. However, call your provider if:

  • You feel your family's diet is inadequate or poorly balanced
  • You or your children have any symptoms of beriberi

Prevention

Eating a proper diet that is rich in vitamins will prevent beriberi. Nursing mothers should make sure that their diet contains all vitamins. If your infant is not breastfed, make sure that the infant formula contains thiamine.

If you drink heavily, try to cut down or quit. Also, take B vitamins to make sure your body is properly absorbing and storing thiamine.

References

Koppel BS. Nutritional and alcohol-related neurologic disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 416.

Sachdev HPS, Shah D. Vitamin B complex deficiency and excess. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 49.

So YT. Deficiency diseases of the nervous system. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 85.